*PLEASE NOTE: Due to the high number of submissions and Submittable's fees for magazines, Waxwing will be capping submissions at 300/month. If you are unable to submit due to this reason, please come back and submit the next month. Thanks for your understanding. -The Editors

Waxwing is published triannually: in October, February, and June. We read submissions of poetry, short fiction, and literary essays August 1 to May 1; translations of poetry and literary prose are read year-round. Each issue features approximately thirteen poets, six prose writers, and six authors in translation.

Poets should send one to five poems, and prose writers one story, essay, novella, or novel chapter (or up to three short-short stories or micro-essays). Each submission should be sent as one file. Cover letters and brief bios are recommended, but optional. Please use the online submission manager for all submissions. Other queries or correspondence should be directed to Co-editors Justin Bigos, Erin Stalcup, and Todd Kaneko at editors@waxwingmag.org.

Translators should follow the same guidelines. They should also include the translated work in its source language, along with any permissions needed to publish the work in both languages. 

Waxwing will respond to each submitted manuscript within four months. If you need to withdraw your piece, please withdraw through the submission manager. If you are withdrawing only part of your submission, please make a note in Submittable (rather than emailing the editors). If Waxwing publishes your writing, the editors reserve the right to republish it in future print anthologies and/or as promotional broadsides. Authors retain rights to their work—if the work is republished in a future collection or anthology, please indicate that it originally appeared in Waxwing. Waxwing is unable to offer monetary payment for work at this time. Thank you for your interest in and support of Waxwing.


Ends on May 1, 2017

Waxwing wants to publish fiction and nonfiction that can stand alongside poetry: stories and essays where language is the primary concern. We seek writing that is like the characters and creatures we named the journal after—Dedalus made something that had never before existed, Icarus joyfully dared to do what hadn’t been done, and the eponymous birds seem to be what they’re not. We're interested in narratives that risk, that come close to failing but land on the other side, not in the sea, and like the red tips of feathers that look like sealing wax, we love flourishes. We're not interested in virtuosity that pleases the masses, but we do crave intensity, and stories that feel a little dangerous. We seek to showcase the particular and the peculiar, the odd and the revelatory—we want to read stories and essays that make us feel like we are learning something, even if it’s something we can’t quite explain.      

Ends on May 1, 2017

Waxwing publishes poems that sing—of the self, but also of the world. We love poems that love language, love it like a lover, and so wrestle and caress and grind and tease, for the pleasure of it but also the weight of it. We love poems that mean something, whether through the quick electric thrill or the long steady haul. We love poems that are living and breathing, and know they will die. Poems that have the stink of the world on them. Poems that are not mysterious, but mysteries. Poems that keep you up at night, and get you out of bed in the morning. Poems that took something of great worth out of the poets who wrote them, so that they could give it to us.

Before sending poetry or prose in translation to Waxwing, you should read the individual submission guidelines for each genre. Waxwing publishes literature in translation as artistic creations with their own integrity, and with the goal to connect artists that otherwise might not be connected. Translations are especially important to Waxwing for this reason, as well as for the potential they have to create a powerful dialectic between two mindsAs such, Waxwing is seeking work in translation that shows a dexterity with language, as well as the courage to ask the harder questions about the world— and about the act of translation itself.

Please include, in one document (.doc, .pdf, or .docx): the poems or prose in translation, the poems or prose in their source language, and any language of permissions that will be needed to publish both.